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Kellogg Fellow Launches Nation’s First Racial Equity-Oriented Financial Institution

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June 7, 2019

Southern African Kellogg Fellows Team Up to Address Challenges

KFLA Network Supports Children, Families and Communities

May 31, 2019

Latin American Kellogg Fellows Collaborate Closely for Common Good

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N.C. Congresswoman Alma Adams on Hunger and Closing the Gap

The Kellogg fellow is in her third term representing North Carolina 12th Congressional District

March 11, 2019

Kellogg Fellows Examining Equity through Food

How can issues of societal and racial equity be better understood through the lens of food?

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When my mother died in 1997, I found in her possessions, a letter I had written to her in 1963, when I was a college student. In it, I promised I would make some contribution in my life to the integration of science and spirituality... 

When my mother died in 1997, I found in her possessions, a letter I had written to her in 1963, when I was a college student. In it, I promised I would make some contribution in my life to the integration of science and spirituality, creating context which allows both to exist without dichotomy. I had long since forgotten that letter and was surprised and deeply moved that my mother had saved it. On reflection, in school I always found science both joyous and easy and my parents were deeply religious and deeply committed to serving society. My life journey leads me full circle to that promise: an environmental engineer helping to bring technological solutions to environmental problems especially those associated with energy and a leader working to acknowledge and enhance the spiritual intelligence in the public sector.

I consider my greatest accomplishment as the Chancellor of the UMKC to be the framework I provided to the University’s stakeholders—a university engaged in enhancing social progress, economic development, and the quality of life in the region as it contributes to corporations, businesses, government, non-profits, minority groups, and parents and citizen. I consider my greatest life accomplishment to be the character and social contributions that my children are making and the parenting toward “doing social good” in which they are engaged with my grandchildren. “The purpose of life is to become” (author unknown); that is my commitment.

This essay and portrait is part of a community-art and leadership project called “wdydwyd?” Tony Deifell (KNLP-16) invited his colleagues in the Kellogg Fellowship to reflect on what motivates them to follow their personal and professional paths by answering the question, “Why do you do what you do?”


“wdydwyd?” has reached over 1.5 million people worldwide and it has been used for team-building at Google, Twitter, many colleges and universities, nonprofits and K-12 classrooms. And, according to Wired Magazine, “In Silicon Valley, that question has been the hottest team-building meme since Outward Bound – and it’s spreading.” For more information: http://wdydwyd.com/leadership.


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