June 11, 2019

Kellogg Fellow Launches Nation’s First Racial Equity-Oriented Financial Institution

Rende Progress Capital Targets Racial Wealth Gap with Loans to Entrepreneurs of Color

June 7, 2019

Southern African Kellogg Fellows Team Up to Address Challenges

KFLA Network Supports Children, Families and Communities

May 31, 2019

Latin American Kellogg Fellows Collaborate Closely for Common Good

KFLA Global Summit Sparks Many New Partnerships

April 23, 2019

Three Sisters Kitchen Nourishes Albuquerque’s Communities

Kellogg Fellow Sees Healthy Food Access as Basic Right

March 26, 2019

N.C. Congresswoman Alma Adams on Hunger and Closing the Gap

The Kellogg fellow is in her third term representing North Carolina 12th Congressional District

March 11, 2019

Kellogg Fellows Examining Equity through Food

How can issues of societal and racial equity be better understood through the lens of food?

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Walking through any major urban community in the world—even in those environments that we might call “home”—one common thing can be noted. There are people who call this home, yet, they seem out of place.

 Walking through any major urban community in the world—even in those environments that we might call “home”—one common thing can be noted. There are people who call this home, yet, they seem out of place. Whether they are homeless, down on their luck, or seem to be walking through life without the rush, focus or energy that others may have, they look at us, yet, they avoid visible eye contact. As I reflect on these people, a simple question enters my mind—does anyone see their shadow?

In our rush to get to our next “thing,” we avoid these persons as if they are toxic. Some of us choose to live in gated communities to “keep them out” and to give us a sense of security. Periodically, we become engaged in service programs to “help the needy.”

But who benefits from this service? For a brief moment, our gifts to them may bring relief, happiness, and gratitude. But, is this enough? Do we really create community or give them a voice when we spend but a brief moment with them?

Through my applied policy research, I try to bring social awareness to the plight of marginalized youth in society. The effort to give them a voice is intended to create opportunities to uncover the lived realities of these individuals. The Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance Forum in Tulum, for example, used Foto Voz, a project that employed photography and words to allow us to see and hear the soul and dreams of people that many of us were unaware of. When we take these opportunities to engage marginalized people in authentic ways, the divide between us/them lessens, creating a temporary shared experience.

Gaining such insight is what has motivated me to do what I do—to learn and to help give voice to those that we often forget exist as our neighbors.

This essay and portrait is part of a community-art and leadership project called “wdydwyd?” Tony Deifell (KNLP-16) invited his colleagues in the Kellogg Fellowship to reflect on what motivates them to follow their personal and professional paths by answering the question, “Why do you do what you do?”


“wdydwyd?” has reached over 1.5 million people worldwide and it has been used for team-building at Google, Twitter, many colleges and universities, nonprofits and K-12 classrooms. And, according to Wired Magazine, “In Silicon Valley, that question has been the hottest team-building meme since Outward Bound – and it’s spreading.” For more information: http://wdydwyd.com/leadership.


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